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Workshops

Full- and Half-Day Workshops will be offered at the US-IALE 2017 Annual Meeting. Pre-registration and an additional fee will be required for participation. 

Sunday, April 9, 2017

Organizer(s):
Jianguo (Jack) Liu, Francesco Tonini, Yue Dou, Hongbo Yang – Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability, Michigan State University, USA
Date and Time:
Sunday, April 9 - 9:00am to 5:00pm
Fee:
$60
Description:

Landscapes and people in different places across the world are increasingly interconnected, both ecologically and socioeconomically. To understand and manage such complex interconnections, a new integrated framework of telecoupling is proposed (http://telecoupling.org). Telecouplings are socioeconomic and ecological interactions between multiple places over distances. They occur through payment for ecosystem services, trade, water transfer, foreign investment, migration, and tourism. They also emerge when information flows, organisms disperse, species invade, and diseases spread. The award-winning framework of telecoupling emphasizes reciprocal cross-scale and cross-border interactions (e.g., feedbacks). Telecouplings have profound implications for landscape sustainability as they can transform landscape structure, function, pattern, process, and dynamics. They pose new global challenges and offer exciting new opportunities for the landscape ecology community. In this workshop, we will introduce the telecoupling framework, present applications of the framework, and conduct hands-on exercises with the new Telecoupling Toolbox, a free and open-source suite of spatially-explicit tools for describing and quantifying telecouplings. Workshop participants will have an opportunity to apply the framework and toolbox to their socio-environmental issues of interest. Programming skills are not required for this workshop. Note: registration fee does not include lunch; lunch is on your own. 

Intended Audience:
The target audience encompasses attendees at any career stage and with a variety of interests, such as landscape change, climate change, natural resource policy and governance, biodiversity, ecology, and landscape patterns and processes.

Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Organizer(s):
Falk Huettmann, Ph.D., Associate Professor -EWHALE lab- Inst. of Arctic Biology, Biology & Wildlife Department, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Date and Time:
Tuesday, April 11 - 1:00pm to 5:00pm
Fee:
$35
Description:

R is the analytical platform of choice for many research projects. However, the graphics components are not so easy to master for many users, specifically for landscape ecology applications and research publications. Arguing with statistical output requires sophistication and good knowledge. While the learning curve is steep for some users, using R to create graphics can save time throughout the research and review process. This half-day workshop will provide an overview of how to craft publication quality plots and maps using R. This session will demonstrate how to create effective R graphics for most statistical outputs (box & fiddle plots, frequency distribution curves, confidence intervals and standard errors, various bar graphs, linear regression lines and overlaid smoothers, diagnostic plots, clusters) including labeling, axes and range manipulations, subsetting, color choices, and multi-panel graph designs. This session then moves briefly into how to best visualize the results of classification and regression trees, partition tree plots, varclust, and bagging and boosting. Next, it focuses on GIS maps (point, polyline and polygon shapefiles, raster maps, merged products from GPS and online maps) with specific DPI’s for scientific publications and visualizations. Creating various 3-dimensional figures gets covered as well (profiles, spheric and needle plots, rotations, some TIN surfaces), and some time is devoted to introduce TRELLIS plots and other advanced features. Besides others, the ggplot2 package will be discussed for many graphic operations. While the focus of this workshop is not really on how to create ‘artistic’ outputs, it will enable participants to solve their technical graphics problems in R on their own and find good strategies on how to obtain a statistically valid and convincing output all  created by repeatable R code.     (Please note that this workshop is not directly hands-on for all applications, but participants can re-produce all the approaches and code presented during or after the workshop. Use of personal laptops equipped with R to run the code during this session is encouraged. In case participants see specific and new topics to present on for general interest to this workshop, please contact the organizer any time for details)

Intended Audience:
All
Organizer(s):
Audrey Mayer, PhD, Associate Professor, Michigan Technological University; Chair, US-IALE Policy Committee
Date and Time:
Tuesday, April 11 - 12:00pm to 3:00pm
Fee:
$35
Description:

Recent events in the United States and the world have emphasized that there are significant obstacles to creating and implementing policies that are “evidence-based” using the best available science. As scientists, we often grapple with our role in the policy process, striving to toe the line between advocating for our science and politicizing it. In this moderated discussion, we will learn from a panel of AAAS Science & Technology Policy Fellows who have experience with infusing policy with ecological science. The AAAS Fellows include:

  • Pamela Collins: 2015-2017 AAAS S&RP Fellow hosted by the Institute for Water Resources, USACE; ecosystem restoration, coastal resilience, ecosystem services
  • Margaret Murphy: 2015-17 AAAS S&TP Fellow hosted by the Office of Water, US EPA; ecotoxicology
  • Adam Rosenblatt: 2016-17 AAAS S&TP Fellow hosted by Office of Biological & Environmental Research, Department of Energy; climate change
  • Dilip Venugopal: 2015-2017 AAAS S&TP Fellow hosted by Office of Air & Radiation, US EPA; sustainable agriculture, biodiversity conservation, ecological restoration, air quality and health
  • Emily Weeks: 2015-2017 AAAS S&T Fellow hosted by the Bureau for Food Security, USAID; land tenure, resource rights and natural resource management, conservation science, climate smart agriculture

The panelists will discuss best practices for communicating with our Congressional representatives, how and when to work with federal agencies, how science informs policy and vice versa, and how we can design and communicate our research to support the work of our government at all levels. A recent brief interview with Paul Cairney, “How to be heard” (Science, Vol 355(6325), p. 572), will provide a good introduction to the issues that will be discussed (we will have copies available at the workshop).

Intended Audience:
All
Organizer(s):
Brian Pickard, NCSU, US-IALE Student Representative; Vaclav Petras, NCSU; Anna Petrasova, NCSU; Rose Graves, UW-Madision, US-IALE Student Representative
Date and Time:
Tuesday, April 11 - 1:00pm to 5:00pm
Fee:
$0
Description:

In this workshop we will introduce GRASS GIS 7, a free and open source scientific platform for geoprocessing. The workshop will provide a step by step tutorial to guide beginners from basic raster and vector analysis to more complex topics such as landscape structure analysis, lidar data processing, and spatio-temporal data handling and visualization. Participants will also learn how to use GRASS GIS with Python to optimize their workflows, and how to leverage the integration of R with GRASS GIS for statistical analysis. No prior knowledge of GRASS GIS, Python or R is required.

Intended Audience:
Students